SFF And Sydney Contemporary Announce New Exhibition At The Hub

11 Mar 2015

The 62nd Sydney Film Festival and Sydney Contemporary announce a new initiative, The Sydney Contemporary Video Exhibition. The exhibition will open at the Festival Hub in Town Hall on Thursday 4 June and run for the duration of the Festival (until 14 June).

The Sydney Contemporary Video Exhibition will showcase works from 12 video artists from leading Australian and international galleries. Josh Azzarella (USA), Heath Franco (AUS), Deborah Kelly (AUS), Christian J. Heinrich (AUS), Juan Pablo Langlois (Chile), Nicolás Superby (Chile), Jess MacNeil (AUS, UK), Baden Pailthorpe (AUS), Cameron Robbins (AUS), Joan Ross (AUS), Allison Schulnik (USA) and Grant Stevens (AUS) have been chosen to feature in the exhibition.

"We are thrilled to be collaborating with the Sydney Film Festival to showcase a variety of the most interesting moving image artworks," said Barry Keldoulis, Director of Sydney Contemporary."The exhibition includes works that approach the medium from a cinematic world view and others that explore a completely different way of seeing. The Festival Hub is a great space to explore video art by artists at the forefront of their field".

"The Sydney Contemporary Video Exhibition features a range of styles and approaches," said Sydney Film Festival Director Nashen Moodley. "Artworks include performance art; elements from classic Hollywood films; and digital and stop-motion clay animation. Each artist’s work explores the possibilities of video art and comments on contemporary culture in radically different ways," he said.

The Hub at Sydney’s Town Hall is the nucleus of Sydney Film Festival. The Hub is a lounge, gallery and performance space offering festivalgoers a space to drink, dine, relax, enjoy entertainment and discuss films.

The Sydney Contemporary Video Exhibition artists and included works:

JOSH AZZARELLA (USA, New York) creates videos and photographs that explore the power of context in the authorship of memory, often utilising seminal moments in pop culture and news media to create accessible confrontations with historiography. In this work, the artist has created two altered, lengthened, and reconstructed scenes from the iconic film by Alfred Hitchcock, North by Northwest. In both, he has isolated, extracted, reconstructed, and reconfigured their minor movements to lengthen the moment of anticipation surrounding an impending event. Ultimately, the viewer is left only with the anticipation and no event ever occurs – a signature, haunting trademark of his work.

Untitled #8, 2004, Video, 2 minutes, 31 seconds, 7 + 3 APs, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles
Untitled #27 (Unknown Rebel), 2006, Video, 1 minute, 11 seconds, 7 + 3 APs, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles
Untitled #100 (Fantasia), 2007-2009, High Definition Video, 12 minutes, 6 seconds, Ed. 5, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles Untitled #141 (The Sun is The Same...), 2012, HD Video, silent, 19 minutes, 31 seconds, Ed. 3+1AP, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles
Untitled #142 (Bob Coe from Wasco), 2013, 2 Channel HD Video, 10.2 Surround Sound, 3 minutes, 18 seconds; 4 minutes, Ed. 3+1AP, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles
Untitled #149 (Cleaver), 2 Channel HD Video, silent, 19 minutes, 50 seconds, Ed. 3+1AP, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles 

HEATH FRANCO (AUS, Sydney) presents video works featuring self-performances in a variety of costumes and backed by an array of bizarre special effects. Though dense with meaning, at their most basic these videos are about the construction and the unravelling of the self through language set to a traditional Australian suburban backdrop. He graduated from a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Drawing & Painting), College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales in 2005. He has since participated in numerous exhibitions, performances and video screenings. Recent exhibitions include Primavera 2013: Young Australian Artists at the Museum of Contemporary Art, and IMPACT at the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Franco’s video works have been screened at Art Fair Tokyo, Sydney Contemporary, Gallery of Modern Art Brisbane, Centro Cultural Matucana 100, Santiago, Chile, and Art Stage Singapore. In 2012, Franco was awarded the The Churchie National Emerging Art Prize, and in 2014 the Fisher’s Ghost Contemporary Award. Franco’s work is held in the public collections of Artbank, Griffith University Art Gallery and the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Heath Franco is represented by Galerie pompom, Sydney.
HOME TOWN, 2014, High Definition Digital Video, stereo sound. Duration: 9 minutes 29 seconds, Edition of 3 + 2 AP, courtesy the artist and Galerie pompom, Sydney
YOUR DOOR, 2011, High Definition Digital Video, stereo sound, 16:9. Duration: 8 minutes 17 seconds, Edition of 3 + 1 AP, courtesy the artist and Galerie pompom, Sydney

DEBORAH KELLY (AUS, Sydney) has works that have been shown in galleries and cinemas around Australia and in the Singapore, Sydney and Venice Biennales. They have also been shown in London, Cologne, Weimar, Leipzig, Moscow, St Petersburg, Seoul, Paris, Rio, Zagreb, Prague, Brno, Hong Kong, Vienna, Jakarta and several US cities. Her 2001 collaboration with Tina Fiveash, Hey, Hetero! has been shown and studied extensively, and will appear in a new Greek iteration for the 2015 Thessaloniki Biennale. Her projects across media are concerned with lineages of representation, politics and history in public exchange. She is a founding member of the boat-people artist collective, most recently included in the 2014 TarraWarra Biennial. Most recently, her work was included in Zero Tolerance at MOMA PS1 in New York, touring to Basel Miami. Her MCA commissioned 2005 work considering the rise of religiosity in the public sphere, Beware of the God, included videos in train stations, 40,000 postcards and projections onto clouds over Sydney Harbour. The participatory memorial she devised for the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests, Tank Man Tango, was performed in 20+ cities around the world on 4 June 2009. Beastliness, 2011, Digital Video, single channel, colour with sound, 16:9 ratio, 3 minutes, 17 seconds, Edition of 8 Deborah Kelly and Christian J Heinrich, Earthlings' Greetings, 2014, digital video, 1 minute, 5 seconds, courtesy the artists

CHRISTIAN J. HEINRICH (AUS) is an internationally exhibited filmmaker, video and projection artist. His work utilises new media to explore open-text narrative discourse with a non-didactic fervour. Deborah Kelly and Christian J Heinrich, Earthlings' Greetings, 2014, digital video, 1 minute, 5 seconds, courtesy the artists

JUAN PABLO LANGLOIS + NICOLÁS SUPERBY (CHILE) Juan Pablo Langlois is a sculptor and installation artist and one of the most important exponents of Chilean Contemporary Art. His first visual works were closely related to his training as an architect and consisted of inquiries about optical art caught in the two-dimensionality of the canvas. In 1969, he surprised visitors to the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes with the installation of filled garbage bags of paper bound together forming a sleeve 300 metres. The exhibition Soft Body (1969, MNBA, Santiago) marked the beginning of his career as an installer. His work has been published through a number of catalogues, monographs and other publications. Nicolás Superby majored in cinematography at the Film School of Chile and earned a masters in film production and art direction from the ESCAC School of Cinema and Audiovisual de Catalunya. He has participated in a number of films as writer, director, art director and photographer in works like Das Golem, D-Build, The Notebooks of Don Juan R., The Ivan Woman, the documentary Manto de Cobre, Waiting for Godot, Integral Design and Scenery for Contemporary Dance Productions, One Heart Your Hands and Unleash, among others. In 2004 he participated in the workshop-collective Magic Lantern making 35mm slide shows at the Cultural Centre of Spain in Chile. Recetario/Papeles Sádicos (La niña que movía la cabeza, Triángulo Sádico, Cabeza con Anteojos), 2011, stop animation, 15 minutes 8 seconds , courtesy the artist and Galeria AFA, Santiago La Playa, 2011, digital video, 10 minutes, 10 seconds, courtesy the artist and Galeria AFA, Santiago

JESS MACNEIL (AUS, Sydney & UK, London) works at the points of intersection between painting, installation, video and photography, often taking as her subject matter the dynamics of the human/environment relationship. Preoccupied with the lingering traces of human passage through time and particular places, her works invite consideration of the complex preconditions and subtle repercussions of our encounters. Her paintings and video works explore the visible and invisible influences that govern the way we perceive and inhabit the world, presenting an emphatically subjective visual translation of the amorphous shape of our relationship to our surroundings and to one another. Her work is held in public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and the Australia Council for the Arts; as well as numerous Australian and international private collections. The Thaw, 2007, Digital Video, single channel, colour with sound, 8 minutes, Edition of 8 Syzygy: The Gulls, 2008, Digital Video, single channel, colour with sound, 9 minutes, Edition of 8

BADEN PAILTHORPE (AUS, Sydney) is an Australian contemporary artist working predominantly within the field of new media; his work increasingly exposes the growing reach and the subtle operations of contemporary militarism, institutions and power. He has participated in over 60 solo and group exhibitions, including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; NIMk, Amsterdam; la Gaîté Lyrique, Paris; the Palais de Tokyo, Paris; ARTSPACE, Sydney; and the UQ Art Museum, Brisbane; in 2013, he was the inaugural Australia Council artist in residence at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. He is undertaking a PhD in New Media Aesthetics at UNSW, Sydney. He holds an MFA in new media from l'Université Paris VIII and an MA from the College of Fine Arts, UNSW. MQ-9 Reaper I, 2014, High Definition 3D animation, colour, stereo, 4 minutes 39 seconds, ED. 5 + 2AP. Collection of the University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, the Australian Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra and private collections, courtesy the artist and Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney Cadence I, 2013, HD video, colour, stereo sound, 6 minutes, Edition of 5 + 2 AP, collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra and private collections, courtesy the artist and Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney

CAMERON ROBBINS (AUS, Melbourne) creates works based on interaction with natural forces and the elements. He has devised many ways of producing a kind of collaboration between artist and nature. This is evident in the series of Wind Drawing Machines. These mechanical devices are set up in different locations to collect random wind energy and translate it into a strangely readable format of ink drawings on paper, which themselves take on the form of the storm. This work has led to an exploration of the forms of the vortex, the focus of natural energy. He has designed and built a series of Vortex Chambers, in order to study, exhibit, and film this phenomenon. Further research into the elemental, combined with his musical career on clarinet and saxophone, has led to the production of the Steam Organ, a self-determining musical device which is built into a large furnace structure. The Organ is allowed to play freely in the fire, expressing the heat, wind and ambient acoustic. Other sound works include The Sea Wailing – a tide-powered organ on the cliffs of South Australia. Structure of Vortices, 2012, Digital Video, single channel, colour, 8 minutes

JOAN ROSS (AUS, Sydney) sees Australian colonisation like a car crash. Her works have been described as "packing a punch" and are delivered with great lashings of humour, wit and irony. In recent video animation works and prints, she reconfigures the colonial Australian landscape, drawing specific attention to history, memory and the absurd. A vital element of her work is to navigate the viewer through discomforting themes, encouraging us to rethink the impact of colonisation, imperialism, racism, consumerism and our ‘disposable’ culture. She is interested in the retelling of history and the consequential lies and bias that ensue. Through her work, she wants to enlighten people about the prejudices she sees in contemporary Australia. Often the significance of materials guides her process. Kangaroo fur in particular is a reoccurring material in her work. Rich with connotations of sex and violence, she also uses it to explore issues surrounding Australian identity in a post-colonial context. A more recent inclusion in her art works is the use of highvisibility safety materials which use the visual pollution of ‘fluoro’ as a metaphor for colonisation. BBQ This Sunday, BYO, 2011, digital animation, edition of 20, courtesy the artist and Michael Reid, Sydney | Berlin | Murrindindi The claiming of things, 2012, digital animation, 7 min 20 sec, edition of 10, courtesy the artist and Michael Reid, Sydney | Berlin | Murrindindi Touching other people's butterflies, 2013, digital animation, 2 min 45 sec, edition of 6, courtesy the artist and Michael Reid, Sydney | Berlin | Murrindindi Colonial Grab, digital animation, 7 mins 37 secs, edition of 10, courtesy the artist and Michael Reid, Sydney | Berlin | Murrindindi

ALLISON SCHULNIK (USA, Los Angeles) strange, agitated paintings reflect her background in animation, but privilege the sculptural aspect of paint through their densely impastoed surfaces, as a motion-like sensibility affords her paintings unparalleled depth and energy. Her Gothic, figurative works suggest the more sinister and foreboding aspects of contemporary life. She choreographs her subjects in compositions that embody a spirit of the macabre. She earned her BFA in Experimental Animation from the California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She has had solo exhibitions at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art; Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas; Rokeby Gallery, London; Unosunove Arte Contemporanea, Rome; Division Gallery, Montreal; and ZieherSmith Gallery, New York; in addition to her inclusion in film festivals around the world. Her work is in the public collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Santa Barbara Art Museum (California); Museé de Beaux Arts, Montreal; Farnsworth Art Museum, Maine; and the Laguna Art Museum, California. S MOUND, 2011, Single channel stop-motion, clay animation video with sound, 4 minutes, 33 seconds, Ed. 5 + 2 APs, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles EAGER, 2013, Single channel stop -motion, clay animation video with sound, 8 minutes, 20 seconds, Ed. 5 + 2 APs, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles HOBO CLOWN, 2008, Single channel stop -motion, clay animation video with sound, 5 minutes, 5 seconds, courtesy the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles

GRANT STEVENS (AUS, Sydney) works predominantly with video, as well as photography, sculpture and installation, his art practice explores how the verbal and non-verbal languages of popular screen culture interface with contemporary subjectivity. He has held numerous solo exhibitions in Australia, as well as in New Zealand, Italy and the United States. His work has also been exhibited in many group shows at publicly funded museums and contemporary art spaces nationally and internationally. In 2007, he received his PhD from the Queensland University of Technology, and has held a number of academic positions. He is represented by Gallery Barry Keldoulis, Sydney, and Starkwhite, Auckland. Danger Zone, 2003, digital video, 19.5 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland No Sir, 2003, digital video, 2.5 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland Some Want It All, 2003, digital video, 3 minutes, 3 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland Like Two Ships, 2005, digital video, 2 minutes, 53 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland The Switch, 2006, digital video, 3 minutes, 14 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland Dazed and Praised, 2004, digital video, 4 minutes, 1 second, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland Really Really, 2008, digital video, 7 minutes, 33 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland Crushing, 2009, digital video, 4 minutes, 11 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland The Wandering, 2009, digital video, 3 minutes, 5 seconds, edition of 5, courtesy the artist and STARKWHITE, Auckland