French Films

A selection of films from French filmmakers, including Michael Haneke's Cannes competition contender Happy End, and 1960s classic Belle de Jour.

Back to Burgundy

The vineyards of Burgundy are the stunning backdrop of this warm family drama about estranged siblings putting resentments aside to save their family estate.

Belle de Jour

In 1967 Catherine Deneuve entranced audiences in Belle de Jour, Luis Buñuel’s satire of sexual manners. 50 years on it stands as a masterpiece of erotic cinema.

Call Me By Your Name

The sumptuous new romance by Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, SFF 2010) is a sensual story of first love set in the Italian countryside.

Ciao Ciao

A sophisticated city woman visits her rural parents in Song Chuan’s incisive snapshot of the tension between tradition and modernity in contemporary China.

Félicité

Winner of the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize at the Berlinale, this is a surprising, music-infused drama about a proud and spirited woman working as a singer in Kinshasa.

Happy End

Master Austrian director Michael Haneke has won the Cannes Palme d'Or with his last two films, The White Ribbon (2009) and Amour (SFF 2012).

I Am Not Your Negro

Narrated by Samuel L Jackson, this mesmerising Oscar-nominated film channels the impassioned words of writer James Baldwin, one of the most incisive commentators on race in America.

Lust For Sight

When a filmmaker is told by his doctor that he can't see colours, he sets out to define what it means to see. The knowledge that he may lose it all fuels his lust for sight.

Madame

World Premiere: Toni Collette, Harvey Keitel, Rossy de Palma and Michael Smiley star in this romantic comedy about an unexpected love affair that starts at dinner and spreads to the Paris streets.

My Life as a Zucchini

An Oscar-nominated Swiss-French stop-motion family animation that's realistic and life affirming, dealing with real issues in a way that doesn't patronise or traumatise its audience.

Napalm

Renowned French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann (Shoah), now 91, revisits a haunting North Korean encounter in his latest documentary direct from Cannes.

Phantom Boy

From the French team behind the Oscar-nominated A Cat in Paris comes this beautifully animated supernatural crime-fighting adventure, set on the streets of New York.

Wolf and Sheep

This debut feature by a groundbreaking Afghan woman director, a Cannes Director's Fortnight-winner, is an extraordinarily daring and rare view of Afghan rural life and mythology.

The Young Karl Marx

Alongside his film I Am Not Your Negro, playing at SFF this year, director Raoul Peck created this rigorous and fascinating biopic of Karl Marx and the beginnings of communism.